September 6, 1960

As the roster deadline approached the Raiders continued to move pieces, dropping four and adding one. The four players let go were end Dan Edgington, halfbacks John Harris and Brad Myers, and center Mac Starnes. Edgington was perhaps a bit of a surprise as he had been penciled in as a starter opposite Charlie Hardy as recently as the last week of August, but he hadn’t caught a pass in the preseason and with Alan Goldstein and Tony Teresa being considered for the spot, Edgington was apparently expendable. Harris was another who seemed to have a spot on the team, but he had been battling knee problems and the Raiders were comparatively deep in the defensive backfield. Myers was still another who held promise, but he couldn’t get past Teresa, Billy Lott, and Jack Larscheid. Starnes’ release was simple: Jim Otto was already on the roster.

The new player was 6’1″, 220-pound fullback JD “Jetstream” Smith1, out of Compton Junior College. Smith, claimed off waivers from the Chargers, had played against the Raiders on August 19, but hadn’t made the stat sheet. With his combination of speed and power, he could be expected to challenge Lott for the starting fullback spot.

These moves left the Raiders with the mandated 33 players in time for the September 6 deadline.

Hayward Daily Review
Oakland Tribune
San Mateo Times

1Smith has been identified in several different ways by the press and other sources. Most of the papers at the time referred to him at Jetstream or Jet. Others used the name Jim, while still others called him JD. To confuse matters further, Pro Football Reference lists a total of three JD Smith’s playing in the pros at this time. In addition to Jetstream, there was a HB-FB JD Smith who played in the NFL from 1956-66, mostly with the 49ers, but also with the Bears and Cowboys, and an offensive tackle JD Smith who played with the Eagles and Lions from 1959-66. With no definitive answer and no idea which name Smith himself prefers, the Logbook will refer to him as JD to maintain consistency with Pro Football Reference. If anyone knows different, please let me know.

September 4, 1960

Not much news came from the Raider organization today, but the city of Oakland announced they would be holding a “Meet Your Raiders” parade on the 8th to give the locals a chance to see the players before they headed across the bay to play the Oilers on the following Sunday. The route would begin at Jack London Square and end up near Lake Merritt. Players, in uniform, would participate in the parade and provide autographs and photo opportunities afterward. Free eye patches would be given away to kids and an eight-foot long football made of flowers in Raider colors would be in evidence near city hall.

Oakland Tribune

September 3, 1960

The Raiders announced a couple of roster moves today. The team released tackle Larry Lancaster and traded linebacker Buddy Alliston to the Broncos in exchange for Denver’s eighth-round pick in the 1961 draft. Lancaster, picked off the Chargers’ roster in April during the allocation draft, had been well down the depth chart and his departure was no great surprise. Alliston hadn’t made a big splash either and now returned to the team that had him before he came to Oakland. That placed the current roster at 36 players.

Oakland Tribune

September 1, 1960

The uncertain tenure of halfback Severn “Iron Man” Hayes had come to an end. The Raiders had hoped to give the speedy back an extended tryout with the team, but the league informed them they couldn’t do that without adding him to the roster. Doing that would have meant cutting another player, something the team wasn’t willing to do.

Hayes, unsurprisingly, was disappointed. “I’m certain that all I need is the chance. I’d have run right through a wall to make their team.”

The Raider personnel men were now thinking about circumstances in a few days when all teams would have to cut to 33 players before going back up to 35 a couple of days afterward. The Raiders had first choice of those available and, according to Gene Perry, the team’s publicity man, they were hoping to find a couple of big linemen during that period.

Oakland Tribune

August 31, 1960

Not much news out of Raider country today. After a couple of days of rest, the team returned to practice and to begin thinking hard about the Houston Oilers.

Hayward Daily Review
Oakland Tribune
San Mateo Times

August 30, 1960

Continuing to regroup following the grueling road trip, the Raiders took stock of the health of their team. Counted amongst the wounded were backs Luther Carr, Wayne Crow, and Ron Drzewiecki, all with rib injuries, defensive lineman Charley Powell with a sprained knee, guard Wayne Hawkins with a sprained right ankle, and fullback Dean Philpott who continued to nurse a knee injury. Trainer George Anderson said none of the injuries were serious and each of the players, plus quarterback Tom Flores and tight end Gene Prebola, would be available for the Houston game.

All, that is, except Drzewiecki and Philpott, who were placed on injured reserve, reducing the roster to 41 players. The league required all teams to get their count down to 38 and to comply, the team waived guard Jerry Epps, defensive end Jerry Flynn, and receiver Charles Moore, none of whom had made much of their opportunities in preseason work.[1]

Hayward Daily Review
Oakland Tribune
San Mateo Times

[1] There was some disagreement among the sources whether Drzewiecki and Philpott were waived or put on IR. The Review and the Times said IR, the Tribune said they were waived.

August 28, 1960

It was hot and sweaty, there was next to nobody watching, and the Raiders were on short rest twice over. But for a half it didn’t matter. With the temperature creeping up toward the high 80s, just 3,500 locals turned out in the early afternoon sun to see the Pats host Oakland at University of Massachusetts Stadium.

Read more “August 28, 1960”

August 27, 1960

With one game left in the preseason, the Raiders were just trying to keep any more players from getting injured. The team’s top running threat, Jack Larscheid, was reportedly hurt with an unspecified ailment and wasn’t expected to play against Boston. Defensive back Wayne Crow was suffering from a pulled ligament that was likely to restrict him to punting duties. And the team labeled halfback Buddy Allen as doubtful to play, too.

Interestingly enough, the player least likely to play on Sunday was someone who said he was healthy and ready to go. Quarterback Tom Flores said his shoulder felt “much better” and hoped to get in there against the Patriots, but head coach Eddie Erdelatz said that probably wasn’t going to happen, both because he wanted to give his top signal-caller more time to heal and because he wanted another long look at Babe Parilli and Paul Larson.

With the end of the preseason near, some of the Raider players took time to reflect on the team’s chances for the season. Though they hadn’t seen all of the teams in the league yet, most of the players thought the Chargers were the team to beat, while a few others favored the Dallas Texans. One player who wasn’t ready to concede to anyone just yet was Larscheid.

“I don’t think you can count us out,” he said. “I think we can beat both Dallas and Los Angeles. We were just getting organized when we played Dallas and I’m convinced was can take Los Angeles.”

While the team still faced some serious holes in its lineup, the league had provided them at potentially valuable remedy. The Raiders would get the first crack at signing any players let go on the final cut-down day, September 6.

Hayward Daily Review
Oakland Tribune
San Mateo Times

August 26, 1960

Raider co-owner Robert Osborne reaffirmed that his group was serious about landing an American League baseball team for Oakland. “Several of the Raider owners are interested in the baseball project,” he said, “and we hope to go after the franchise with the same vigor as we did the football thing.”

Speaking of the football thing, the team was trying to determine who would be able to take the field against Boston. Tom Flores was back to throwing the ball and showing few, if any, effects from his recent shoulder injury, but Eddie Erdelatz still had no plans to play him in the game. His tight end, Gene Prebola, who sat out the Buffalo game, was doubtful for this one, too. Also doing time in the trainer’s room were halfback Dean Philpott and defensive back John Harris, both of whom were battling knee sprains.

In league news, the AFL announced that the regular season roster limit would be 35 instead of 33, giving teams a little more depth, a need felt especially by injury-prone teams like the Raiders. Teams would still have to make a preliminary cut to 38 by August 30. The Raiders currently had 43 players on the squad.

Oakland Tribune