July 27, 1960

Four days from the preseason opener, the focus was all on the Dallas Texans. Getting the most press was the Texans’ early start to training camp. They, along with the Chargers had broken a league rule starting camp a week earlier than allowed. Each team paid a $1,000 fine, but otherwise suffered no penalty.

“We go against the Texans minus a week’s preparation,” said head coach Eddie Erdelatz, “Those seven days mean a great deal. With us, they could mean the difference between a reasonably skilled club and one merely adequate. Right now we are rounding into shape, but we haven’t completed the full circle. The boys are beginning to get the real feel of my style. I’m not building alibis, I’m not crying the lowdown blues, I’m merely emphasizing facts. We’ll do our best, and our best may be pretty good, but Dallas figures to give us trouble.

“We will learn much from this first game and I’m sure we’ll have a better idea of just what we have when it is over. I’d sure like to be starting even with Dallas. They got that week’s jump in practice which means they are just that much further along than we are. I can’t understand coaches and club officials doing something like that. This game is supposed to teach sportsmanship and fair play.”

Regardless, most observers agreed that Hank Stram’s Texans were formidable. They had three 1959 All-Americans on offense, including Oakland native Chris Burford at end, fullback Jack Spikes, and guard Marvin Terrell. Also in the backfield with Spikes were Johnny Robinson and Abner Haynes, who had been with the Raiders briefly in the spring. Cotton Davidson, who had appeared in a few games in the mid-1950s for Baltimore was at quarterback.

Haynes, though, was who had everyone excited. “He has looked like a million dollars, said Dallas PR man Bob Halford, “Even better than we anticipated. He runs like Willie Galimore of the Chicago Bears.”

On defense, the Texans had seven players with previous NFL experience, most notably end Paul Miller formerly of the Rams, and ex-Niners tackle Ray Collins.

The Raiders would be down one more man on game day. End Ron Beagle, an Erdelatz favorite, hadn’t yet healed from his knee injury and was sent home for 30 days rest, after which the team would re-evaluate him.

Oakland Tribune

March 3, 1960

Early on the first morning of the league meeting in Oakland, commissioner Joe Foss and Oakland general manager Chet Soda made an announcement that 14 players had been assigned to the team:

George Blanch, a 6’0″, 195-pound halfback from Texas. A solid performer for the Longhorns in 1957 and 1958, he made UPI 2nd team All-Southwest Conference his junior year, but in his senior season, 1959, his performance faded on offense and he spent most of his time on the defensive side of the ball.

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