August 21, 1960

A report from Raiders team trainer George Anderson said tight end Gene Prebola’s pulled hamstring muscle would keep him out of Wednesday night’s game in Buffalo. The team held out hope that the Boston University product would recover in time play against the Patriots on Sunday.

Two other players, defensive end Carmen Cavalli, who had suffered a broken nose against Los Angeles, and fullback Billy Lott, who bruised a shoulder in the same game, were going to be ready to go against the Bills, according to Anderson. However, there was still no word about the health of quarterback Tom Flores, who had taken a beating of his own Friday night.

Oakland Tribune

July 25, 1960

The Raiders suffered a significant blow on the last day of two-a-day practices. Quarterback hopeful Tom Flores, in a neck-and-neck contest with Paul Larson for the starting job, went down with a pulled calf muscle. Trainer George Anderson wouldn’t put a number on how many days he might miss and head coach Eddie Erdelatz was faced with the possibility of having only one quarterback, Larson, ready to go against Dallas. Third-team signal-caller Bob Webb was still out with a bad knee and Tony Teresa was firmly installed at halfback.

The team had seen fewer new injuries in recent days, but Flores’ setback was a reminder that luck could change. Others who could miss game action because of injuries were defensive end Charley Powell, who was definitely out for the contest because of his strained Achilles tendon, and guards Charlie Kaaihue and Don Manoukian who were still being treated for pulled muscles.

Oakland Tribune

July 19, 1960

Fully a week into training camp, the Raiders held their first scrimmage and head coach Eddie Erdelatz was cautiously pleased. “For the first time out it wasn’t too bad,” he said. At quarterback, Paul Larson looked a sharper than Tom Flores, completing 11 of 21 passes with many of the incompletions coming from receiver drops. Flores had a rougher time, connecting on just 5 of 14, throwing three interceptions. Third-stringer Bob Webb got off to a good start, connecting on the longest play of the day, an 18-yard pass to Charlie Hardy, but disaster struck when he went down with a knee injury. Trainer George Anderson said he may have torn cartilage and could need surgery, which would shut him down for the year. At other positions, tight end Gene Prebola, defensive end Carmen Cavalli, and cornerback Eddie Macon looked particularly good. Observers thought the defensive line played well as a group, but Erdelatz downplayed it, saying, “The defense is always ahead of the offense at this stage of the game.”

Once the scrimmage was over, it was time for another round of cuts, reducing the number of players in camp to 56. On their way out were tackle Cloyd Boyette, halfback Purcell Daniels, halfback Wes Fry, Jr., son of Raider player personnel director Wes Fry, Sr., tackle Willie Hudson, a former honorable mention AP Little All-American for Cal Poly-San Luis Obispo, who was in camp without a contract after getting cut by the Chargers, and Hudson’s former college teammate, tackle Rich Max.

Long Beach Press Telegram
Oakland Tribune

April 11, 1960

After an extensive search, the SeƱors hired George Anderson, the current president of the Pacific Coast Athletic Trainers Association, to head up the team’s training staff. An eleven-year veteran in the field, he had spent the previous two years as an assistant trainer at the University of California.

Oakland Tribune