October 5, 1960

The news about Tony Teresa’s injury got worse. He tried to practice today, thinking he could play through a pulled back muscle, but he had to leave the workout early, saying he could barely move around out there. An examination by trainer George Anderson indicated that there might be cartilage damage which might put the Raider halfback out of the lineup for a much longer time than initially thought. If Teresa wouldn’t be able to play on Sunday, Jack Larscheid would get the starting nod.

Oakland Tribune

October 4, 1960

Back in the South again, the Raiders began to prepare for Sunday’s game in the hot, humid weather of central Texas. Staying at a hotel chosen by most visiting AFL teams because the facilities were integrated, the team was struggling to stay upbeat after the demoralizing loss to the Broncos. To make matters worse, more key players were sustaining hurts. Team trainer George Anderson said center Jim Otto was having trouble breathing after a chest injury in Denver and had also “popped a knee” in the game. Otto said he’d be in the game on Sunday no matter what. And to top things off, halfback Tony Teresa hurt himself today in practice. Running a pass route, he twisted his back and his status for the game was currently uncertain.

Hayward Daily Review
Oakland Tribune
San Mateo Times



October 3, 1960

Travel day for the Raiders. Their destination was Grand Prairie, Texas, about 15 miles west of the Cotton Bowl, where they would play the Dallas Texans next Sunday. The team’s training staff reported that most of the players made it through the Denver game without serious mishap, except for receiver Charlie Hardy, who left the game with a “slight” concussion. He was expected to be ready to go again by game day.

Oakland Tribune

October 1, 1960

The Raiders were putting the finishing touches on their preparation for tomorrow’s game against the Broncos, but according to Eddie Erdelatz, there weren’t going to be any significant personnel changes.

“How do you improve on a winner?” he asked, rhetorically.

Nevertheless, there were a couple of changes and the coaching staff was excited about them. Halfback Bob Keyes, who had been added to the team just before they left on the road trip, hadn’t had a chance to play against the Oilers, but Erdelatz commended his ability to get up to speed and looked forward to using him tomorrow.

The other recent addition, guard John Dittrich, was making a good impression, too. “Dittrich’s a real smart kid and after just one practice we decided he would be ready to go against the Broncos,” said line coach Marty Feldman, “He picked up our stuff right away and he reported in top condition, so I see no reason why he shouldn’t do a good job for us.”

In other good news, the training staff reported that Ron Warzeka and Dalton Truax would both be available to play after missing the Houston game because of unspecified injuries.

Hayward Daily Review
Oakland Tribune
San Mateo Times

September 20, 1960

Still looking for the formula that would put them on the winning track, the Raiders made more roster moves today, adding linebacker Riley Morris and defensive tackle Bill Striegel. Morris, according to some reports had been signed off waivers from the Chargers as early as September 8, but had only now put in an appearance at team headquarters and was officially added to the roster.

Striegel, at 6’2″ and 235 pounds, had been a teammate of Tom Flores at the College of the Pacific and was drafted by the Eagles in 1958 in the eighth round. He missed his entire rookie season because of an injury suffered in the College All-Star Game, but appeared in all 12 games for the Eagles in 1959. Taken by the Dallas Cowboys in the 1960 NFL expansion draft, he was cut by the team near the end of the preseason and subsequently picked up by the Raiders.

To make room for the two new additions, the team cut linebacker Billy Ray Locklin and defensive lineman Glenn Holtzman, who never showed up after being acquired from the Chargers two weeks ago. Locklin, signed in June, had appeared in each of the first two games, garnering three tackles and a sack to show for his efforts.

While the front office tinkered with the roster, Coach Erdelatz made some changes in the depth chart. Alan Goldstein, who had a productive day as a substitute against Dallas, was installed in the starting role at flanker, moving Tony Teresa to halfback. Teresa’s move to behind the quarterback displaced Jack Larscheid from the starting lineup.

And though the team escaped the Texans game without injury, they didn’t fare so well in today’s workout. Both defensive end Ron Warzeka and tackle Dalton Truax came up limping, Warzeka with a right ankle problem, and Truax with a pulled muscle in his right leg. Neither injury was thought to be serious and both players were expected to see action against the Oilers.

Hayward Daily Review
Monroe Morning World
Oakland Tribune
San Mateo Times

August 30, 1960

Continuing to regroup following the grueling road trip, the Raiders took stock of the health of their team. Counted amongst the wounded were backs Luther Carr, Wayne Crow, and Ron Drzewiecki, all with rib injuries, defensive lineman Charley Powell with a sprained knee, guard Wayne Hawkins with a sprained right ankle, and fullback Dean Philpott who continued to nurse a knee injury. Trainer George Anderson said none of the injuries were serious and each of the players, plus quarterback Tom Flores and tight end Gene Prebola, would be available for the Houston game.

All, that is, except Drzewiecki and Philpott, who were placed on injured reserve, reducing the roster to 41 players. The league required all teams to get their count down to 38 and to comply, the team waived guard Jerry Epps, defensive end Jerry Flynn, and receiver Charles Moore, none of whom had made much of their opportunities in preseason work.[1]

Hayward Daily Review
Oakland Tribune
San Mateo Times

[1] There was some disagreement among the sources whether Drzewiecki and Philpott were waived or put on IR. The Review and the Times said IR, the Tribune said they were waived.

August 27, 1960

With one game left in the preseason, the Raiders were just trying to keep any more players from getting injured. The team’s top running threat, Jack Larscheid, was reportedly hurt with an unspecified ailment and wasn’t expected to play against Boston. Defensive back Wayne Crow was suffering from a pulled ligament that was likely to restrict him to punting duties. And the team labeled halfback Buddy Allen as doubtful to play, too.

Interestingly enough, the player least likely to play on Sunday was someone who said he was healthy and ready to go. Quarterback Tom Flores said his shoulder felt “much better” and hoped to get in there against the Patriots, but head coach Eddie Erdelatz said that probably wasn’t going to happen, both because he wanted to give his top signal-caller more time to heal and because he wanted another long look at Babe Parilli and Paul Larson.

With the end of the preseason near, some of the Raider players took time to reflect on the team’s chances for the season. Though they hadn’t seen all of the teams in the league yet, most of the players thought the Chargers were the team to beat, while a few others favored the Dallas Texans. One player who wasn’t ready to concede to anyone just yet was Larscheid.

“I don’t think you can count us out,” he said. “I think we can beat both Dallas and Los Angeles. We were just getting organized when we played Dallas and I’m convinced was can take Los Angeles.”

While the team still faced some serious holes in its lineup, the league had provided them at potentially valuable remedy. The Raiders would get the first crack at signing any players let go on the final cut-down day, September 6.

Hayward Daily Review
Oakland Tribune
San Mateo Times

August 26, 1960

Raider co-owner Robert Osborne reaffirmed that his group was serious about landing an American League baseball team for Oakland. “Several of the Raider owners are interested in the baseball project,” he said, “and we hope to go after the franchise with the same vigor as we did the football thing.”

Speaking of the football thing, the team was trying to determine who would be able to take the field against Boston. Tom Flores was back to throwing the ball and showing few, if any, effects from his recent shoulder injury, but Eddie Erdelatz still had no plans to play him in the game. His tight end, Gene Prebola, who sat out the Buffalo game, was doubtful for this one, too. Also doing time in the trainer’s room were halfback Dean Philpott and defensive back John Harris, both of whom were battling knee sprains.

In league news, the AFL announced that the regular season roster limit would be 35 instead of 33, giving teams a little more depth, a need felt especially by injury-prone teams like the Raiders. Teams would still have to make a preliminary cut to 38 by August 30. The Raiders currently had 43 players on the squad.

Oakland Tribune

August 22, 1960

With the Raiders leaving Santa Cruz to head east and play the Bills, today marked the end of team’s first training camp, but bad news accompanied the departure. Head coach Eddie Erdelatz revealed that quarterback Tom Flores was likely to miss the rest of the preseason. The cause was a shoulder injury suffered at the hands of the Chargers on what Erdelatz called a “hit after the whistle.” That meant the signal-calling chores would be performed by Paul Larson, who had thrown but a single pass in live action so far, and newcomer Babe Parilli, who had less than a week’s familiarity with the playbook.

Oakland Tribune

August 21, 1960

A report from Raiders team trainer George Anderson said tight end Gene Prebola’s pulled hamstring muscle would keep him out of Wednesday night’s game in Buffalo. The team held out hope that the Boston University product would recover in time play against the Patriots on Sunday.

Two other players, defensive end Carmen Cavalli, who had suffered a broken nose against Los Angeles, and fullback Billy Lott, who bruised a shoulder in the same game, were going to be ready to go against the Bills, according to Anderson. However, there was still no word about the health of quarterback Tom Flores, who had taken a beating of his own Friday night.

Oakland Tribune