August 30, 1960

Continuing to regroup following the grueling road trip, the Raiders took stock of the health of their team. Counted amongst the wounded were backs Luther Carr, Wayne Crow, and Ron Drzewiecki, all with rib injuries, defensive lineman Charley Powell with a sprained knee, guard Wayne Hawkins with a sprained right ankle, and fullback Dean Philpott who continued to nurse a knee injury. Trainer George Anderson said none of the injuries were serious and each of the players, plus quarterback Tom Flores and tight end Gene Prebola, would be available for the Houston game.

All, that is, except Drzewiecki and Philpott, who were placed on injured reserve, reducing the roster to 41 players. The league required all teams to get their count down to 38 and to comply, the team waived guard Jerry Epps, defensive end Jerry Flynn, and receiver Charles Moore, none of whom had made much of their opportunities in preseason work.[1]

Hayward Daily Review
Oakland Tribune
San Mateo Times

[1] There was some disagreement among the sources whether Drzewiecki and Philpott were waived or put on IR. The Review and the Times said IR, the Tribune said they were waived.

April 8, 1960

The Señors announced the signing of five more players, bring the total of official signees to ten. Two of the players were part of the second round of allocation draft choices, with more names presumably to come. The new draftees were:

Buddy Allen, a 5’11”, 195-pound halfback from Utah State. A two-year letterman with the Aggies, he gained 7.0 yards per carry his senior season, scoring seven touchdowns, and was originally drafted by Boston.

Ramon Armstrong, a 6’1″, 225-pound, guard/defensive tackle out of TCU, chosen from the New York Titans. He was also drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles in the 20th round and was a participant in the East-West Shrine Game.

The team also confirmed previous reports that North Carolina end Alan Goldstein had indeed been drafted from Buffalo and had been signed.

The Señors also picked up free agent Jerry Flynn, a 6’1″, 230-pound defensive end from Humboldt State.

Lastly, they signed Tony Teresa, a 5’10”, 185-pound quarterback/halfback out of San Jose State. Teresa had been an excellent two-way player for the Spartans, leading them in both passing and defensive interceptions during his time there. After leaving college, he played for the British Columbia Lions in the 1956 and 1957, first at quarterback, then in the defensive backfield. In 1958, he got a cup of coffee with the 49ers, but was cut in October.

Oakland Tribune
Oxnard Press Courier
San Jose State football media guide
San Mateo Times
Tucson Daily Citizen