October 13, 1960

The team officially designated injured linebacker Riley Morris as “doubtful” for Sunday’s game against the Patriots saying he was still recovering from taking a knee in the back and wasn’t yet ready to play.

In sportswriter Ray Haywood’s column in the Oakland Tribune, space was provided for his colleague Scotty Stirling’s observations during his three-week road trip with the team.

Stirling was impressed by the players’ response to the team’s “inevitable mistakes in travel scheduling, accommodations, practice fields, etc.,” and said, “Their attitude is a compliment to Eddie Erdelatz. They are so devoted to the coach that they laugh off inconveniences which would cause most teams to call a grievance committee meeting.”

Among the tales he returned with was news that 5’8″ guard Don Manoukian was the humorist on the team, that Erdelatz rates trainer George Anderson as the best he’s ever worked with, that tackle Paul Oglesby’s nickname is “Cheyenne” based on a television character and is incidentally “the handsomest player in the league,” that Eddie Macon’s nickname is “Old Folks”, which is perhaps appropriate given that he is the only player on the team who has seen his 30th birthday, and that assistant coach Tommy Kalmanir is a poker player, but solo only. “Playing alone is the best way to break even,” is his explanation.

Oakland Tribune
San Mateo Times

March 22, 1960

As the first round of the AFL’s allocation draft got underway, Oakland general manager Chet Soda claimed that some teams were protecting more than eleven players, because some nominally draft-eligible players were unavailable due to no-trade clauses in their contracts. Soda was particularly interested in Houston quarterback George Blanda, but couldn’t talk the former Chicago Bear into signing with Oakland, even when offered more money than the Oilers had given him. Soda complained to Commissioner Joe Foss, but Foss, while sympathetic, refused to remedy the situation. The commissioner did agree that in subsequent rounds, teams would be required to include players with no-trade contracts among their eleven protectees.

In other news, head coach Eddie Erdelatz selected ex-Ram and -Colt halfback Tommy Kalmanir as his offensive backfield coach. An All-American at Nevada just after World War II, Kalmanir played three seasons with Los Angeles (1949-51) and spent 1953 with Baltimore before spending a final year as a player with Edmonton in the Canadian leagues in 1955. After his playing days were done, he put in time as a coach in the CFL before Oakland tabbed him.

The team also announced a player transaction. USC lineman Al Bansavage, a Minneapolis draftee whose signing rights had transferred to Oakland (a fact not previously reported), had signed with the Baltimore Colts.

Oakland Tribune