August 11, 1960

After a couple of days at full health, two players turned up with injuries in practice today. Quarterback Bob Webb, just days back from a twisted knee at the beginning of camp, reinjured the joint and will be out for the Titans game, at least. Shortly thereafter, end Carl Isaacs also went down with a knee injury during a receiving drill. Occurring just 40 minutes into a scheduled 90 minute practice, Eddie Erdelatz had seen enough and scrapped the rest of the workout, fearing even more damage just two days before the team’s next game.

Oakland Tribune

August 9, 1960

Getting back to work after a day off, the Raider coaches made some changes on the offensive line. Chris Plain, who had been at left tackle was now on the right side, replaced by Ron Sabal, who had been playing left guard. Taking Sabal’s place was Don Manoukian, who was returning from an injury. Wayne Hawkins was now on the right side with Joe Barbee, a defensive lineman moving to the other side of the ball, backing up. Jim Otto was still at center.

Hayward Daily Review

August 6, 1960

Raider quarterback hopeful Tom Flores continued to make a strong push for the starting job in a morning scrimmage today. The former Pacific Tiger dispelled doubts about his once-injured throwing shoulder by hitting on a couple of long touchdowns, one each to Eddie Macon, who was trying his hand on offense, and to Tony Teresa, who made a tough catch in traffic.

Head coach Eddie Erdelatz was impressed. “The team gets better with each workout and is still on the upgrade,” he said. “Flores is calling the plays well and knows what to do in most situations.”

Aside from the scrimmage, the team put an emphasis on the kicking game. Linebacker Larry Barnes continued to improve as a placekicker, connecting on an extra point and a 32 yard field goal.

After practice, Erdelatz and his staff hopped aboard a plane bound for Los Angeles, where they would scout the Chargers in advance of their preseason contest next weekend in Sacramento.

Oakland Tribune

August 5, 1960

Raider quarterbacks Tom Flores and Paul Larson were under heightened pressure in practice today as the coaching staff had the defense work on a set of “red dogging” (linebacker blitz) drills. Both passers found their effectiveness seriously diminished under the heavy rush and clearly needed more work in this area.

Two players who didn’t take part in the now once-daily drills were defensive back Alex Bravo and receiver Charlie Hardy, both of whom were held out because of muscle pulls. The team expected them to be back to full health within a couple of days.

Hayward Daily Review
Oakland Tribune

August 4, 1960

The Raider coaching staff continued to add to the offensive playbook in preparation for the Chargers game in Sacramento. As of today, the team had 65 plays installed: 20 running and 45 passing.

There was another new face at the day’s workout, the last of the two-a-day sessions. Defensive end Charley Powell, who had injured his Achilles tendon on the first day of training camp, was finally back on the field working out with his teammates. Head coach Eddie Erdelatz commented that Powell was looking “a lot better” and was “beginning to catch on to what we are doing.”

Meanwhile, ABC television, the broadcast network of the AFL, announced that four of the Raiders’ road games would be carried on their local affiliate, KGO: September 25 in Houston, October 2 in Denver, October 9 in Dallas, and November 27 in Los Angeles.

And for those fans who were planning to see home games in person, Greyhound Bus Lines announced plans to sell game tickets in their northern California depots and offer special charter buses for transportation to and from games.

Hayward Daily Review
Oakland Tribune
San Mateo Times

August 3, 1960

The Raiders returned to two-a-day practices on Wednesday with coach Erdelatz adding to both the offensive and defensive playbooks to expand the team’s repertoire. However, three players would practice with the team no more.

Among the cuts were guard Lou Byrd, tackle Fred Fehn who had missed most of camp with an injury, and one of yesterday’s pickups, fullback Jim Varnado, who was badly out of shape and apparently not likely to get into shape anytime soon. Also leaving camp was heretofore unmentioned guard Gil Ane, Hawaii native, and brother of former Detroit Lions Pro Bowl guard Charlie Ane, who was currently in camp with the expansion Cowboys in the NFL. Ane’s departure from camp was expected to be temporary as he was heading home to Oregon to care for a sick daughter.

Off the field, television dates were announced. The Raiders would appear on the local ABC affiliate, KGO, channel 7, four times throughout the year: September 25 at Houston, October 2 at Denver, October 9 at Dallas, and November 27 at Los Angeles.

Oakland Tribune

August 2, 1960

The team had a day off following the game, but head coach Eddie Erdelatz took that time to review the films, and based on what he saw, cut five players the following morning: halfbacks Alex Gardner and Ray Peterson, tackle Willie Boykin, guard Bob Harrison, and defensive back Bob Fails. He then added one back in the person of 6’1″, 185-pound halfback John Harris, formerly of Santa Monica Junior College. Harris combined speed and strength as a runner for the Corsairs and made first team All-Metro Conference in 1957 and later spent a season with the Saskatchewan Roughriders. Most recently, he had been in Chargers camp, but had been waived, giving the Raiders a chance to pick him up. Also returning to the team was tackle Fred Fehn, who had spent the past couple of weeks nursing a leg injury. This put the head count at 48, five over the limit of the first mandatory cut on August 22.

Erdelatz said he found no surprises in the movies. “We’ll try and correct the mistakes made in that game before going on to the new stuff,” he said. “They performed well considering everything and we’re expecting considerable improvement by the time we play New York.” To that end, he held a surprise 90-minute scrimmage that focused on improving both the running and the passing game.

Afterward, even more changes were made. Guard Charlie Kaaihue, a potential first-teamer who had been temporarily sidelined because of injury, was cut for what was reported as “disciplinary reasons.” The team also announced the signing of yet two more players, fullback Jim Varnado, and end Charles Moore. Additionally, Erdelatz made an offensive line adjustment, moving Ron Sabal from right guard to right tackle, in place of Don Churchwell. Don Manoukian moved in to take Sabal’s spot at guard. And, finally, Varnado’s signing meant a move for Brad Myers from fullback to halfback.

Hayward Daily Review
Oakland Tribune
San Mateo Times

July 29, 1960

Raider players engaged in a light workout as oddsmakers judged the Dallas Texans as at least two-touchdown favorites over them in the opener. “Considering their advantage in having a week’s more practice, I think the odds are just about right,” groused head coach Eddie Erdelatz, “I’d gladly pay (the $1,000 fine imposed by AFL commissioner Joe Foss) for an extra week’s work.”

Oakland Tribune

July 27, 1960

Four days from the preseason opener, the focus was all on the Dallas Texans. Getting the most press was the Texans’ early start to training camp. They, along with the Chargers had broken a league rule starting camp a week earlier than allowed. Each team paid a $1,000 fine, but otherwise suffered no penalty.

“We go against the Texans minus a week’s preparation,” said head coach Eddie Erdelatz, “Those seven days mean a great deal. With us, they could mean the difference between a reasonably skilled club and one merely adequate. Right now we are rounding into shape, but we haven’t completed the full circle. The boys are beginning to get the real feel of my style. I’m not building alibis, I’m not crying the lowdown blues, I’m merely emphasizing facts. We’ll do our best, and our best may be pretty good, but Dallas figures to give us trouble.

“We will learn much from this first game and I’m sure we’ll have a better idea of just what we have when it is over. I’d sure like to be starting even with Dallas. They got that week’s jump in practice which means they are just that much further along than we are. I can’t understand coaches and club officials doing something like that. This game is supposed to teach sportsmanship and fair play.”

Regardless, most observers agreed that Hank Stram’s Texans were formidable. They had three 1959 All-Americans on offense, including Oakland native Chris Burford at end, fullback Jack Spikes, and guard Marvin Terrell. Also in the backfield with Spikes were Johnny Robinson and Abner Haynes, who had been with the Raiders briefly in the spring. Cotton Davidson, who had appeared in a few games in the mid-1950s for Baltimore was at quarterback.

Haynes, though, was who had everyone excited. “He has looked like a million dollars, said Dallas PR man Bob Halford, “Even better than we anticipated. He runs like Willie Galimore of the Chicago Bears.”

On defense, the Texans had seven players with previous NFL experience, most notably end Paul Miller formerly of the Rams, and ex-Niners tackle Ray Collins.

The Raiders would be down one more man on game day. End Ron Beagle, an Erdelatz favorite, hadn’t yet healed from his knee injury and was sent home for 30 days rest, after which the team would re-evaluate him.

Oakland Tribune