April 9, 1961

As hinted at a few days ago, the Raiders have hired George Dickson to coach their offensive backs. The 37-year-old Dickson played his college ball at Notre Dame, then took a series of assistant coaching jobs in the collegiate ranks, including at Glendale Junior College, NYU, Notre Dame, Dayton, Marquette, and USC, before landing most recently at the College of the Pacific.

Oakland Tribune

 

April 7, 1961

The Raiders announced the signing of five more free agents today: halfback Bob Cabanyog, defensive back Ted Cano, guard Tom Cousineau, halfback Herm Urenda, and defensive lineman Dave Williams.

The 22-year-old Cabanyog, a 6’1″, 205-pounder from Salinas, played his college ball at Pacific where his speed and blocking skills were particularly prized.

Cano, 23, 6’0″ and 190 pounds, went to high school in San Francisco before going north to play running back for Washington State. Given the overwhelming need for players in the secondary the Raiders were going to try him out there.

Cousineau, now 27, had been with the Raiders briefly in training camp last year, but returned to Indiana to “fulfill a high school teaching commitment” and was being given another shot at pro ball this season.

The 5’10”, 180-pound Urenda, 22, was a backfield teammate of Cabanyog at Pacific and despite good running skills in the open field was also going to be tried out in the defensive backfield.

The Raiders hoped that the 22-year-old Williams, at 6’6″ and 270 pounds, would provide more size and strength to a unit that was badly overmatched at times last season. He played his college ball at Sacramento City College.

Fresno Bee-Republican
Oakland Tribune

April 4, 1961

Confirming rumors of a week ago, the Raiders made what was called “the biggest trade in their short history” today. The team sent quarterback Babe Parilli and fullback Billy Lott to the Boston Patriots in exchange for halfback Dick Christy, fullback Alan Miller, and defensive tackle Hal Smith. By season’s end last year, Parilli had been firmly relegated to backup status, but Lott was a key member of the offense, finishing second in rushing with 520 yards and leading the team with 49 catches.

The 25-year-old Christy, at 5’10” and 190 pounds finished second on the Patriots in rushing, was useful in catching passes out of the backfield, and was their primary kick return man. However, he was also capable of playing in the defensive backfield and the Raiders hinted he would be tried there.

The 6’0”, 220-pound Miller, 23, led his team in rushing with 416 yards and caught 29 passes. Both he and Christy showed a propensity to fumble the ball, a problem the plagued the Raiders last year, though Lott had not been part of the problem, having coughed the ball up just twice.

At 6’5” and 250 pounds, the 25-year-old Smith added much-needed bulk to the Raider defensive line. He played in 13 games last year, starting the season with three games for the Broncos before moving to the Pats.

Eddie Erdelatz was happy with the deal. “We’re extremely sorry to lose Lott and Parilli, but by the same token, we feel we have strengthened ourselves immeasurably by getting these three fine ballplayers,” he said.

Boston coach Lou Saban echoed his Raider counterpart. “We hated to part with Miller and Christy,” he said, “but to get what we wanted we had to give up good men. We needed a veteran quarterback to go along with Butch Songin.”

Raider general manager Bud Hastings said the team was continuing to look for other good deals.

Boston Globe
Hayward Daily Review
Oakland Tribune
San Francisco Chronicle
San Francisco Examiner

March 30, 1961

The Tribune’s Scotty Stirling reported today that the Raiders were looking to trade up to two of their offensive backs in return for some help on defense, particularly at defensive tackle, outside linebacker, and cornerback. The team wouldn’t mention which players were on the block.

“We look, first of all, for the best football player, regardless of position,” said line coach Marty Feldman, “so in any trade we may get a man for a position other than those we feel need the most help.”

Stirling also said Eddie Erdelatz was in the process of hiring another assistant and was currently conducting interviews.

Oakland Tribune

March 29, 1960

George Ross’s column in the Tribune today took on “a fellow who writes for one of the lesser papers across the bay” who complained that “Oakland is a bush league town,” said he’d give 50-to-1 odds that Oakland never built a stadium, and wouldn’t support the team even if they did. Ross didn’t identify the writer or the paper.1 To counter the other writer’s argument, Ross provided quotes from the Raider owners.

Ed McGah: “For the benefit of the few readers the guy might have on this side of the bay, I’ll cover some of that 50-to-1 money right now.”

Robert Osborne: “I’ve got 10-to-1 we’ll get a stadium and the Raiders will be in it, and so will an American League baseball team.”

Wayne Valley: “We wouldn’t be here today if we weren’t sure a stadium is going to be built in Oakland. We’re preparing for the 1961 season, our preseason ticket sales campaign is under way, we’re expecting better crowds than last year, we see no reason to think the Raiders won’t be playing football in 1962, 1963, 1970, and in Oakland as soon as possible.”

Oakland Tribune

1. I poked around but couldn’t find who the author or the paper was.

March 27, 1961

Columnist George Ross argued in today’s Tribune that if Raider fans didn’t support the team when it played in San Francisco they’d never get a chance to support them in Oakland. “Our golden egg,” he wrote, “will wind up in somebody else’s nest–in Sacramento, or San Jose, or Fresno, or out of state–and we’ll be in Bushville, by the Bay.” He cited an assertion by the city of Minneapolis that the addition of the Twins and Vikings represented “a $15 million addition to the local economy,” and exhorted his readers to start buying up those season tickets or say goodbye to the team forever.

Oakland Tribune

March 26, 1961

Tribune writer Scotty Stirling followed Tom Louderback around for a day as the Raider linebacker hawked season tickets in and around downtown Oakland. Louderback, along with Jack Larscheid, Wayne Crow, and Ron Sabal made up the “Four Men in Motion” campaign put in place by ticket manager Al Salisbury to help the team reach its goal of selling 15,000 season tickets for the 1961 campaign. Louderback was said to be the leading seller of the four and sold 200 on the day Stirling accompanied him.

Louderback said, “Several people refused to buy because they don’t want to drive to Candlestick Park, but the real fans seem to realize the club will have to be a success in San Francisco if it is to survive until our coliseum is built in Oakland.

“I’ve only run into a few people who weren’t interested in the Raiders. You just have to see the enthusiasm and then you realize most people in the Eastbay want to back the club. They like the personalized sales service, too.”

AFL Passing Numbers

The AFL released its individual passing totals today, and by a method not spelled out in the story, Jack Kemp of the Chargers was deemed to hold the number one spot. The Raiders’ Tom Flores came in at sixth place, while Babe Parilli finished tenth. Denver’s Frank Tripucka topped the list in attempts with 478, completions with 245, yards with 3,039, and interceptions with 34. Al Dorow of the Titans led the league with 26 touchdowns and Kemp led in yards per attempt at 7.43.

Hayward Daily Review
Oakland Tribune