March 16, 1961

The Raiders announced four free agent signings today: Bo Bankston, John Freim, Charley Moore, and Fred Tunnicliffe.

Bankston, at 5’10”, 200 pounds out of New Mexico, was signed to play defensive back. All All-Skyline Conference player for two years running with the Lobos, he tried out with the Steelers last year at linebacker, but was deemed too light to play at the position and was released prior to the season.

Freim, 23, was a 6’3”, 225-pound tackle from Adams State in Colorado. He earned Little All-America honorable mention for the Grizzlies last year.

This was Moore’s second go-round with the Raiders. The 6’4”, 220-pound tight end out of Northeastern State in Oklahoma had signed on August 2 last year, but was waived at the end of the month.

The speedy Tunnicliffe played end for UC-Santa Barbara setting NAIA records for receptions and receiving yards in a season in 1959. His head coach with the Gauchos that year was former Raider assistant Ed Cody. The 21-year-old stood 5’9” and weighed 175 pounds.

More AFL stats

The league released another batch of stats today, this time covering punt returns. Among teams, the Texans led the league with 15.0 yards per return. The Raiders were dead last at 5.8. Abner Haynes of Dallas led individuals with his 15.4 average. Jack Larscheid finished third bringing back 12 punts for 106 yards and an 8.8 average.

Hayward Daily Review
Oakland Tribune
San Francisco Chronicle
San Francisco Examiner

March 12, 1961

The AFL began its release of official statistics for the 1960 season today and the first data dump included rushing numbers. The Texans led all teams with 1,814 yards or 129.6 per game. The Raiders finished second with 1,785 yards or 127.5 per game.

Abner Haynes of the Texans won the individual crown with 875 yards on 156 carries. Paul Lowe of the Chargers was second with 855 yards and led the league in average gain at 6.3 yards per carry. Oakland’s Tony Teresa finished fifth with 608 yards on 139 carries. Houston’s Dave Smith and Billy Cannon came in third and fourth, respectively.

Hayward Daily Review

October 9, 1960

It started out slowly enough but got wild in the second half. The Texans got on the board first with a long drive in the second period, but Oakland head coach Eddie Erdelatz gave his team an ass-chewing at halftime that spurred them on to a 20-19 nail-biting victory over the Texans in Dallas.

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July 27, 1960

Four days from the preseason opener, the focus was all on the Dallas Texans. Getting the most press was the Texans’ early start to training camp. They, along with the Chargers had broken a league rule starting camp a week earlier than allowed. Each team paid a $1,000 fine, but otherwise suffered no penalty.

“We go against the Texans minus a week’s preparation,” said head coach Eddie Erdelatz, “Those seven days mean a great deal. With us, they could mean the difference between a reasonably skilled club and one merely adequate. Right now we are rounding into shape, but we haven’t completed the full circle. The boys are beginning to get the real feel of my style. I’m not building alibis, I’m not crying the lowdown blues, I’m merely emphasizing facts. We’ll do our best, and our best may be pretty good, but Dallas figures to give us trouble.

“We will learn much from this first game and I’m sure we’ll have a better idea of just what we have when it is over. I’d sure like to be starting even with Dallas. They got that week’s jump in practice which means they are just that much further along than we are. I can’t understand coaches and club officials doing something like that. This game is supposed to teach sportsmanship and fair play.”

Regardless, most observers agreed that Hank Stram’s Texans were formidable. They had three 1959 All-Americans on offense, including Oakland native Chris Burford at end, fullback Jack Spikes, and guard Marvin Terrell. Also in the backfield with Spikes were Johnny Robinson and Abner Haynes, who had been with the Raiders briefly in the spring. Cotton Davidson, who had appeared in a few games in the mid-1950s for Baltimore was at quarterback.

Haynes, though, was who had everyone excited. “He has looked like a million dollars, said Dallas PR man Bob Halford, “Even better than we anticipated. He runs like Willie Galimore of the Chicago Bears.”

On defense, the Texans had seven players with previous NFL experience, most notably end Paul Miller formerly of the Rams, and ex-Niners tackle Ray Collins.

The Raiders would be down one more man on game day. End Ron Beagle, an Erdelatz favorite, hadn’t yet healed from his knee injury and was sent home for 30 days rest, after which the team would re-evaluate him.

Oakland Tribune

March 3, 1960

Early on the first morning of the league meeting in Oakland, commissioner Joe Foss and Oakland general manager Chet Soda made an announcement that 14 players had been assigned to the team:

George Blanch, a 6’0″, 195-pound halfback from Texas. A solid performer for the Longhorns in 1957 and 1958, he made UPI 2nd team All-Southwest Conference his junior year, but in his senior season, 1959, his performance faded on offense and he spent most of his time on the defensive side of the ball.

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