September 20, 1960

Still looking for the formula that would put them on the winning track, the Raiders made more roster moves today, adding linebacker Riley Morris and defensive tackle Bill Striegel. Morris, according to some reports had been signed off waivers from the Chargers as early as September 8, but had only now put in an appearance at team headquarters and was officially added to the roster.

Striegel, at 6’2″ and 235 pounds, had been a teammate of Tom Flores at the College of the Pacific and was drafted by the Eagles in 1958 in the eighth round. He missed his entire rookie season because of an injury suffered in the College All-Star Game, but appeared in all 12 games for the Eagles in 1959. Taken by the Dallas Cowboys in the 1960 NFL expansion draft, he was cut by the team near the end of the preseason and subsequently picked up by the Raiders.

To make room for the two new additions, the team cut linebacker Billy Ray Locklin and defensive lineman Glenn Holtzman, who never showed up after being acquired from the Chargers two weeks ago. Locklin, signed in June, had appeared in each of the first two games, garnering three tackles and a sack to show for his efforts.

While the front office tinkered with the roster, Coach Erdelatz made some changes in the depth chart. Alan Goldstein, who had a productive day as a substitute against Dallas, was installed in the starting role at flanker, moving Tony Teresa to halfback. Teresa’s move to behind the quarterback displaced Jack Larscheid from the starting lineup.

And though the team escaped the Texans game without injury, they didn’t fare so well in today’s workout. Both defensive end Ron Warzeka and tackle Dalton Truax came up limping, Warzeka with a right ankle problem, and Truax with a pulled muscle in his right leg. Neither injury was thought to be serious and both players were expected to see action against the Oilers.

Hayward Daily Review
Monroe Morning World
Oakland Tribune
San Mateo Times

September 13, 1960

Two days out from the loss to the Oilers, the Raiders made a number of personnel moves. Four players were cut, including tackle Joe Barbee, halfback Luther Carr, tackle Don Churchwell, and quarterback Paul Larson.

The team had first installed Barbee, a June signing, on the defense, then moved him to offense, but he never could crack the starting lineup, and had run out of chances. Carr had shown some promise after joining the team in August, looking good against the Bills, but he hurt his ribs in the Boston game and wasn’t healing fast enough to justify the roster spot. Churchwell had been there since the allocation draft in the spring and was a starter early in camp, but eventually Ron Sabal took his spot and made him expendable. Larson, signed in mid-April, had been the highest-profile addition to the team upon his arrival and was a shoe-in to be Tom Flores’s backup until Babe Parilli’s signing, whereupon he became the forgotten man on the roster. And with only 35 spots available, carrying three quarterbacks was a luxury the team didn’t think it could afford.

Taking some of the open spots were ends Doug Asad and Al Hoisington, and halfback Nyle McFarlane. Asad was a 6’2″, 205-pound tight end from Northwestern. A three-year letterman with the Wildcats, he caught only a handful of passes each year, but was good enough to play in the 1959 Blue-Gray game. Picked up by the Oilers in July, he started at least one preseason game for Houston, but didn’t make the team’s final cut , giving the Raiders a chance to grab him.

Hoisington, at 6’3” and 200 pounds, was a speedster out of Pasadena City College who had spent time in camp with the Dallas Texans before being waived, which is where the Raiders got him.

McFarlane was a 6’2″, 205-pound halfback who was a solid ground-gainer during a couple of seasons at Brigham Young, but battled injuries and academic issues during that time. In the spring of 1960, he was still with the Cougars prepping for the fall campaign, but at some point after that he left the team. By August, he was in camp with the Dallas Cowboys, but they cut him before their regular season and the Raiders signed him to take Carr’s spot.

Two additional players, defensive lineman Glenn Holtzman and linebacker Riley Morris, had yet to report to the team after having been signed last week.

While Eddie Erdelatz shuffled players trying to improve his squad, the front office was focusing their concern on ticket sales. The reported attendance for the Oilers game was 12,703, but according to the Kezar Stadium management team, the actual paid figure was only 8,620. General manager Chet Soda said the team needed to average 20,000 per home date to break even. Consensus among the ownership group was that ticket prices were too high and their plan was to petition the San Francisco Parks and Recreation Commission to lower the price of west end zone seats from $4.50 to $2.50 matching the east end zone price.

And in other news, the team completed a change in their practice facility, moving from the Oakland Naval Air Reserve Station to the Alameda Naval Air Station, just a few miles north on Alameda Island. The team cited better field conditions and facilities as the reason for the change.

Alamogordo Daily News
Hayward Daily News
Helena Independent Record
Houston Post
Long Beach Independent
Oakland Tribune
Provo Daily Herald
Reno Evening Gazette
Salt Lake City Tribune
San Antonio Light
San Mateo Times

September 8, 1960

The Raiders made more personnel moves today. In a continuing effort to upgrade their lines, the team signed Glenn HoltzmanPaul Oglesby, and Riley Morris. Holtzman, a 6’3″, 250-pound defensive end out of North Texas State had been drafted by the Rams in 1954 in the 26th round and spent four years in Los Angeles, one of them as a starter. After the Rams traded him, along with six other players and a pair of draft picks, to the Cardinals in exchange for Ollie Matson, Holtzman refused to report to Chicago and pursued careers in acting and professional wrestling instead. Sid Gillman had tabbed him a few months ago to play for the Chargers, but cut him earlier this week, giving the Raiders a chance to pick him up.

Oglesby, a 6’4″, 235-pound tackle from UCLA had been drafted by both the Cardinals and the Oilers and went with Houston. He was plagued by minor ailments in camp, and the Oilers eventually gave up on him and let him go.

Morris, a 6’2″, 220-pound linebacker out of Florida A&M had been released by the Chargers the same day as Oglesby and picked up by Oakland at the same time. Oglesby was added to the active roster right away, but the team was waiting for Holtzman and Morris to report in person before adding them.

To make room on the roster, the Raiders released halfback Buddy Allen. Allen, who scored the first points in franchise history, had looked good early on, but found his playing time reduced as the preseason unfolded and he became a forgotten man as Jack Larscheid and Billy Lott got more attention. Unofficially, Allen ended the preseason with 81 yards on 26 carries and two touchdowns. He also caught five passes for 32 yards. Allen’s departure left just Lott, Larscheid, JD Smith, and Tony Teresa, and Luther Carr in the offensive backfield.

While these moves were going on, Coach Erdelatz continued to prepare for Sunday’s game by naming team captains. On offense the captain would be Tom Flores. A member of the squad since early June, Flores had been the front-runner for the starting quarterback position almost from his arrival and was a clear choice. On defense the captain would be linebacker Bob Dougherty. Dougherty was one of the players chosen in the AFL’s allocation draft back in the spring and had stood out for his exemplary play in the preseason.

On the public relations front, today was the day for the big parade in Oakland. A 4:30pm departure from Jack London Square saw the players and other team officials convoy in convertibles on the half-hour long route to a park next to Lake Merritt with fanfare, autographs, and pictures to follow.

Hayward Daily Review
North Texas University football media guide
Oakland Tribune
Pro Football Reference
San Mateo Times
UCLA football media guide

August 18, 1960

The Raiders finished preparations for tomorrow night’s game against the Chargers. The team began to work new quarterback Babe Parilli into the system, but he was not likely to be up to speed enough to play against Los Angeles. As in the previous two contests, Tom Flores was expected to carry the load for most of the game, if not the whole thing.

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