January 27, 1961

Today the Raiders announced their biggest signing of the offseason so far, inking halfback George Fleming to a contract. From the University of Washington, Fleming was the team’s second-round pick and the sixth-round pick of the Chicago Bears. To convince him to sign with Oakland, Eddie Erdelatz traveled to Seattle to speak with him in person. After the deal was announced, the Raider head coach was “elated.” “Needless to say, we’re very pleased to sign our number two draft choice,” he said. “He’s an outstanding football player and I’m confident he’ll see plenty of action with the Raiders. We plan to use him as a flanker back and also expect to utilize his ability as a placekicker. He’ll help us in several spots.”

Fleming had played quarterback with the Huskies and had been named co-outstanding player in the 1960 Rose Bowl.

In other news, supporters of a multi-purpose stadium in Oakland received encouraging news. Word came out that the American League had identified Oakland as likely site for Major League Baseball expansion by 1964. In response, the chair of the Oakland Coliseum Committee, Robert Nahas, responded by saying, “This gives us a great impetus to proceed with all speed along the lines we are now pursuing with the construction of an all-purpose stadium.” The committee was, at present, trying to fill out the directorship for the non-profit corporation tasked with getting the project underway.

Hayward Daily Review
Oakland Tribune
San Francisco Chronicle

November 9, 1960

The news that the Raiders would not be moving to San Leandro was something of a disappointment to Kezar Stadium administrators, who were struggling to keep the field in good shape with both the Raiders and 49ers playing on it. Said one unnamed department head, “If it rains before, during, or after the 49er/Green Bay game on December 10, the field will be ruined by the Raiders/Titans game December 11. We spent a lot of time and money to re-seed Kezar this spring and it could be wrecked in 27 hours.”

People were trying to come up with something, though. The Alameda County Board of Supervisors and the Oakland City Council met long enough to agree to a more detailed meeting on the 22nd to discuss an Oakland stadium. Much of the discussion concerned making sure all affected parties would be represented in future confabs. To that end, a trio of county supervisors wanted to invite more non-Oakland interests. Robert Nahas, a recent president of the Oakland Chamber of Commerce, pushed back against the argument, saying that, because of Oakland’s outsized tax base within the county, the relative cost burden between city and county wouldn’t be 50/50, but would be closer to 69/31. Nevertheless, the next meeting would include several Alameda County mayors, Chambers of Commerce members, and some state legislators, along with “representatives of the area’s educational institutions.”

In the meantime, the team was still trying to improve their home draw and announced they would be offering $2.50 general admission end zone seats for the Bills game, but only for tickets purchased on game day. This news came out at roughly the same time as a report in The Sporting News revealing actual paid attendance for three games that differed from the official reports: September 11 vs Houston, 8,873 paid, 12,703 reported; September 16 vs Dallas, 7,105 paid, 8,021 reported; October 16 vs Boston, 10,151 paid, 11,500 reported. The same piece reported that the Raiders’ share of the league’s television deal earned them $190,000 while their player payroll totaled $350,000 and their coaches payroll was $65,000.

Oakland Tribune
San Francisco Chronicle
The Sporting News

November 6, 1960

With the players off for another day, talk centered around where the Raiders would play for the remainder of this year and long term. The ownership group was scheduled to meet tomorrow to discuss the San Leandro proposal, but there were no indications as to which way the owners would vote. There was also talk that the group would discuss a reorganization of the team’s management.

While San Leandro was still on the table, it was a good bet that the team would not be playing in a local college stadium. With regard to Stanford Stadium or Memorial Stadium in Berkeley,Stanford assistant athletic director Chuck Taylor said, “I don’t believe this will happen here in the foreseeable future. There might possibly be a one-shot deal worked out some time, but not for this year. There are a lot of problems to be solved, among them the tax difficulty were we to use our facilities for activities not related to educational purposes.”

Unattributed rumors continued to circulate that the team was considering a move to Seattle, Portland, or San Diego.

In addition to the owners’ confab, there was also a joint meeting planned on the 9th between the Alameda County Supervisors and the Oakland City Council to discuss the Oakland stadium proposal. There were two sites to discuss. The first, the Peralta site, would be built on 72 acres south and east of Oakland Auditorium and Exposition Building between Oak Street and Fifth Avenue at a cost of $20,940,000. The second, the Hegenberger Road site, would be built on 140 acres between 66th Avenue and Hegenberger Road and between the Nimitz Freeway and Southern Pacific railroad tracks at a cost of $17,530,000.

A funding plan was put forth by Robert Nahas, a recent president of the Oakland Chamber of Commerce. The city and county would acquire the land jointly in a lease-purchase agreement and a non-profit corporation would be formed by local business leaders to gain funding and build the stadium. Income would be derived through rental of the stadium to the Raiders and other parties who wished to use it. These rents would cover expenses and pay down the loan. Shortfalls would be made good by tax revenues from the general funds of the city and county, a situation expected to exist over the first few years. Once the loan was paid off, the non-profit would dissolve, and the city and county would take over joint ownership of the facility.

Hayward Daily Review
Oakland Tribune
Pasadena Independent Star-News
San Francisco Chronicle